Museum of Modern Art

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Exhibition

Nov 2010 Dec 2010 Jan 2011

Pictures by Women:
A History of Modern Photography

Sep 1, 2010 - Mar 21, 2011
Opening reception:
Sep 1, 2010

Ilse Bing. Self-Portrait in Mirrors. 1931. Gelatin silver print, 10 1/2 x 12 inches (26.8 x 30.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Joseph G. Mayer Fund. © 2010 The Ilse Bing Estate/Courtesy Ed


Helen Levitt. New York. 1981.
Helen Levitt. New York. 1981. Chromogenic color print (printed c. 2005). 18 x 11 15/16" (45.7 x 30.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Marvin Hoshino. © 2010 The Estate of Helen Levitt, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

The Edward Steichen Photography Galleries, third floor

For much of photography’s 170-year history, women have expanded its roles by experimenting with every aspect of the medium. Pictures by Women: A History of Modern Photography presents a selection of outstanding photographs by women artists, charting the medium’s history from the dawn of the modern period to the present. Including over two hundred works, this exhibition features celebrated masterworks and new acquisitions from the collection by such figures as Diane Arbus, Berenice Abbott, Claude Cahun, Imogen Cunningham, Rineke Dijkstra, Florence Henri, Roni Horn, Nan Goldin, Helen Levitt, Lisette Model, Lucia Moholy, Tina Modotti, Cindy Sherman, Kiki Smith, and Carrie Mae Weems, among many others. The exhibition also highlights works drawn from a variety of curatorial departments, including Bottoms, a large-scale Fluxus wallpaper by Yoko Ono.

The exhibition is organized by Roxana Marcoci, Curator; Sarah Meister, Curator; and Eva Respini, Associate Curator, Department of Photography.


Small Scale, Big Change:
New Architectures of Social Engagement

Oct 3, 2010 - Jan 3, 2011
Opening reception:
Oct 3, 2010

Noero Wolff Architects. Red Location Museum Of Struggle, Port Elizabeth, South Africa. 19982005. Photo credit: Iwan Baan



Hashim Sarkis A.L.U.D. Color study for Housing for the Fishermen of Tyre. Tyre, Lebanon. 1998-2008
Image Hashim Sarkis A.L.U.D.

Special Exhibitions Gallery, third floor

This exhibition presents eleven architectural projects on five continents that respond to localized needs in underserved communities. These innovative designs signal a renewed sense of commitment, shared by many of today’s practitioners, to the social responsibilities of architecture. Though this stance echoes socially engaged movements of the past, the architects highlighted here are not interested in grand manifestos or utopian theories. Instead, their commitment to a radical pragmatism can be seen in the projects they have realized, from a handmade school in Bangladesh to a reconsideration of a modernist housing project in Paris, from an apartheid museum in South Africa to a cable car that connects a single hillside barrio in Caracas to the city at large. These works reveal an exciting shift in the longstanding dialogue between architecture and society, in which the architect’s methods and approaches are being dramatically reevaluated. They also propose an expanded definition of sustainability that moves beyond experimentation with new materials and technologies to include such concepts as social and economic stewardship. Together, these undertakings not only offer practical solutions to known needs, but also aim to have a broader effect on the communities in which they work, using design as a tool.

Small Scale, Big Change explores the following projects in depth: Primary School, Gando, Burkina Faso (Diébédo Francis Kéré, 1999–2001); Quinta Monroy Housing, Iquique, Chile (Elemental, 2003–05); Red Location Museum of Struggle, Port Elizabeth, South Africa (Noero Wolff Architects, 1998–2005); METI – Handmade School, Rudrapur, Bangladesh (Anna Heringer, 2004–06); Inner-City Arts, Los Angeles, California (Michael Maltzan Architecture, 1993–2008); Housing for the Fishermen, Tyre, Lebanon (Hashim Sarkis A.L.U.D., 1998–2008); $20K House VIII (Dave’s House), Hale County, Alabama (Rural Studio, 2009); Metro Cable, Caracas, Venezuela (Urban Think Tank, 2007–10); Manguinhos Complex, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (Jorge Mario Jáuregui, 2005–10); Transformation of Tour Bois le Prêtre, Paris, France (Frédéric Druot, Anne Lacaton, and Jean Philippe Vassal, 2006–11); and Casa Familiar: Living Rooms at the Border and Senior Housing with Childcare in San Ysidro, California (Estudio Teddy Cruz, 2001–present).


New Photography 2010:
Roe Ethridge, Elad Lassry, Alex Prager, Amanda Ross-Ho

Sep 29, 2010 - Jan 10, 2011
Opening reception:
Sep 29, 2010

Alex Prager (American, born 1979) Julie. 2007 Chromogenic color print 36 x 47 1/2 inches (91.4 x 120.7 cm) Image courtesy the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York © 2010 Alex Prager


Roe Ethridge. Debora Muller with Tripod. 2008. Chromogenic color print. 43 x 33" (109.2 x 83.8 cm). Private collection. © 2010 Roe Ethridge
Roe Ethridge. Debora Muller with Tripod. 2008. Chromogenic color print. 43 x 33" (109.2 x 83.8 cm). Private collection. © 2010 Roe Ethridge

The Edward Steichen Photography Galleries, third floor

New Photography 2010 presents four artists—Roe Ethridge, Elad Lassry, Alex Prager, and Amanda Ross-Ho—whose photographs mine the inexhaustible reservoir of images found in print media and cinema. Ethridge takes his pictures in “editorial mode,” directly borrowing from commercial images already in circulation, including outtakes from his own illustrational magazine work. Lassry defines his practice as one consumed with pictures, meaning with generic images lifted from consumer society, such as Hollywood publicity stills and design illustrations. Ross-Ho’s hand-drilled sheetrock panels lined up with found pictures and mural-scale images of studio residues renegotiate the various stages of the creative process. Prager takes her cues from pulp fiction and the fashion images of Guy Bourdin to construct filmic narratives starring women disguised under synthetic wigs, dramatic makeup, and retro polyester attire. Infusing the seductive language of film and advertising with a touch of sly conceptualism, the artists included in New Photography 2010 explore the relationship between straight and constructed photograph, image and picture.

This exhibition is organized by Roxana Marcoci, Curator, Department of Photography.


On Line
Drawing Through the Twentieth Century

Nov 21, 2010 - Feb 7, 2011
Opening reception:
Nov 17, 2010



Alexander Calder (American, 1898–1976). A Universe. 1934. Painted iron pipe, steel wire, motor, and wood with string, 40 1/2 x 30" (102.9 x 76.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (by exchange). © 2010 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Alexander Calder (American, 1898–1976). A Universe. 1934. Painted iron pipe, steel wire, motor, and wood with string, 40 1/2 x 30" (102.9 x 76.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (by exchange). © 2010 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

On Line explores the radical transformation of the medium of drawing throughout the twentieth century, a period when numerous artists subjected the traditional concepts of drawing to a critical examination and expanded the medium's definition in relation to gesture and form. In a revolutionary departure from the institutional definition of drawing, and from the reliance on paper as the fundamental support material, artists instead pushed line across the plane into real space, thus questioning the relation between the object of art and the world. On Line includes approximately three hundred works that connect drawing with selections of painting, sculpture, photography, film, and dance (represented by film and documentation). In this way, the exhibition makes the case for a discursive history of mark making, while mapping an alternative project of drawing in the twentieth century. The exhibition includes works by a wide range of artists, both familiar and relatively unknown, from different eras of the past century and from many nations, including Aleksandr Rodchenko, Alexander Calder, Karel Malich, Eva Hesse, Anna Maria Maiolino, Richard Tuttle, Mona Hatoum, and Monika Grzymala.

The exhibition is organized by Connie Butler, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings, The Museum of Modern Art, and Catherine de Zegher, former director, The Drawing Center, New York.

The exhibition and accompanying performance series are made possible by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann, The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and the Robert Lehman Foundation.


Allora & Calzadilla
Performance 9

Dec 8, 2010 - Jan 10, 2011
Opening reception:
Dec 8, 2010

Allora & Calzadilla, Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on Ode to Joy for a Prepared Piano, 2008, prepared Bechstein piano, pianist (Andrea Giehl), 81 inches. Photo by Marino Solokov. Copyright Allora



Allora & Calzadilla. 
Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on Ode to Joy, No. 1. 
2008. 
Modified Bechstein piano, 
40 x 65 x 84 5/8" (101.5 x 165 x 215 cm). 
Courtesy of the artists and Gladstone Gallery, NY. 
Photo by David Regen
Allora & Calzadilla. Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on Ode to Joy, No. 1. 2008. Modified Bechstein piano, 40 x 65 x 84 5/8" (101.5 x 165 x 215 cm). Courtesy of the artists and Gladstone Gallery, NY. Photo by David Regen

The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium, second floor

For the ninth installment of the Performance Exhibition Series, the artists Jennifer Allora (b. 1974) and Guillermo Calzadilla (b. 1971) present Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on Ode to Joy for a Prepared Piano (2008). For this piece, the artists carved a hole in the center of a grand piano, through which a pianist plays the famous Fourth Movement of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, usually referred to as “Ode to Joy.” The performer leans over the keyboard and plays upside down and backwards, while moving with the piano across the vast atrium. The result is a structurally incomplete version of the ode—the hole in the piano renders two octaves inoperative—that fundamentally transforms both the player/instrument dynamic and the signature melody, underlining the contradictions and ambiguities of a song that has long been invoked as a symbol of humanist values and national pride.


Andy Warhol
Motion Pictures

Dec 19, 2010 - Mar 21, 2011
Opening reception:
Dec 14, 2010



Andy Warhol. Kiss. 1963–64. 16mm film (black and white, silent). 54 min. at 16fps. © 2010 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved. Film still courtesy of The Andy Warhol Museum
Andy Warhol. Kiss. 1963–64. 16mm film (black and white, silent). 54 min. at 16fps. © 2010 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved. Film still courtesy of The Andy Warhol Museum

The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art Exhibition Gallery, sixth floor

Among Warhol’s cinematic oeuvre, the black and white silent films are the most daring and experimental in their selection of subject and theme, psychological acuity, rhythmic pacing, and sheer beauty of form. Although these films were originally shot at sound-film speed (24 frames per second), Warhol specified that prints be projected at a slower speed of 16 frames per second, a rate used in the projection of silent films from the 1890s through the 1920s. For this exhibition, a selection of Warhol’s films made in 1963–1966 has been transferred from 16mm film to DVD at the speed of 16 frames per second, and projected onto screens and monitors in a gallery setting. Thus it is again possible to see the works as Warhol intended, and to appreciate the ways in which he challenged and provoked both subject and viewer in his manipulation of moving images.

This exhibition originated at MoMA as Andy Warhol: Screen Tests (shown at MoMA QNS from May 1 to September 1, 2003). With the addition of Andy Warhol’s silent films, the show debuted as Andy Warhol: Motion Pictures at KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin (May 8–August 8, 2004), and was also presented at Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro (April 26–June 26, 2005); Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo (June 16–August 14, 2005); Malba—Colección Costantini, Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires (September 23–November 21, 2005); the Moscow Museum of Modern Art (December 18, 2008-February 9, 2009); and the Galerie Rudolfinum in Prague (January 29–April 5, 2009). It is organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Director of MoMA PS1 and MoMA’s Chief Curator at Large.